Cranmer Local History Group
Researching the history of Aslockton, Scarrington and Whatton-in-the-Vale - Established 2001
 
 
 
 

 

Cranmer Local History Group Listed Buildings


The Old Greyhound Public House
Grade II English Heritage Reference 503454
Date Listed Monday 23rd July 2007 Ordnance Survey Grid SK7417040009
Lattitude 52.9523 Longitude -0.8975
Address Main Street Aslockton Nottinghamshire NG13 9AD

ASLOCKTON

1778/0/10014 MAIN STREET
23-JUL-07 The Old Greyhound Public House and adj
acent coach house and stabling range

II
Public house and adjacent stabling and coach house.

DATE:
Pub has early C18 rear but front range is early C19, as is the adjacent stable and coach house. There have been some alterations to the pub in the C20.

MATERIALS:
The public house is built of red brick, part whitewashed, and has a pantile roof with brick end stacks. The stable and coach house are similarly of brick with a pantile roof.

EXTERIOR:
The pub is of 2 storeys. The front is a 2-window range of 3-light horizontal sliding sash windows with a central 4-panel front door and overlight. The gable to right is blank but shows where the original cottage wall was retained when the front range was built. This earlier cottage was gable end to the street and projected nearly to it. In this wing are various casements and another smaller horizontal sliding sash. The rear has later extensions. On the left gable end of the front range is a narrow inserted window. The rear of the front range facing the yard has C20 extensions behind which survives the upper part of the earlier cottage with another horizontal sliding sash. In front is a reset hand pump with a rebuilt trough with a datestone 1742, which may be the date of the original cottage. Adjoining to the left and projecting forward is a partly C20 lean-to reception room.

INTERIOR:
The front door leads to a small lobby with, to right, a 6/6 vertical sash window facing into the lobby from the right hand 'snug' and serving as an off-sales hatch. Opposite this is the door which leads to the stair which rises between two walls. Both these features appear original and are strong evidence that the front range was purpose-built as a pub and not as a farmhouse. The snug has two l-plan built-in benches and a small panelled screen by the door. Beyond the front lobby is a passage under the stair landing which leads to a larger reception room on the left of the main front. The front is thus asymmetrical unlike the usual small farmhouse form. The rear wing has a single large space opened up in the C20. The first floor has 4-panel and plank doors and an early C19 fireplace. The roof is early C19 on the front range and also on the rear, probably renewed when the front range was built.

Across the yard entrance from the left end of the front range is the stable and coach house block which has the same brick detailing as the front range and is almost certainly contemporary. It is blank to the street (though with old white lettering proclaiming 'GOOD STABLING'), the coach house being higher and this has a loft door in the right gable end facing the public house. To the yard the coach house has a pair of double doors. The stable has a central door and a boarded window either side but the original windows survive behind.

INTERIOR OF STABLE AND COACH HOUSE:
The stable has four stalls with brick mangers and wooden dividing screens and hay racks above, these partly decayed. There is a loft door to the loft over the coach house. The coach house has canted edges to the interior doorway arch to minimise damage to carriages and gigs.

HISTORY:
Recent research has found that The Old Greyhound is first mentioned as a public house in 1823 (Bingham Hundred Sessions - Alehouse Recognizances) and elements in the design of the front range strongly suggest that this range was purpose built as a public house, complete with stabling and a coach house for a couple of gigs or small carriages.

REASONS FOR DESIGNATION DECISION:
This public house and adjacent stabling and coach house is designated at grade II for the following principal reasons:
* A little altered early C19 building with an early C18 rear wing.
* An unusual building type since front range almost certainly purpose-built as a public house.
* The plan form supports this with a serving hatch in the entrance lobby and a closed-in stair opposite separating the public and private areas.
* Public house fittings survive: built-in benches as well as a lead covered serving counter.
* Original stabling with mangers and stalls together with a small coach house are a very unusual extra survival.
Source: English Heritage
Listed building text is © Crown Copyright. Reproduced under licence.

Additional Information:
Permission was granted by the Local Planning Authority for the demolition of the 18th Centry read and side ranges of the building. That portion has now been rebuilt. The front Georgian Range and the Stables remain the same. The building has now been converted to a dwelling.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
©2013 - 2019 - GR Redford and Cranmer Local History Group all rights reserved.